Tag Archives: ADD+

She just hangs up.2

continued…

small.bull.dog

“Okay, Gary, I don’t know why Gwen feels the need to avoid conversation.  Let me give you an example derived from my personal experience.  When I was dating this bruzia down in the center of town, she did not like to talk face-to-face. So, I suggested she send me a card, hand-delivered.  I didn’t really care that it was hand-delivered or not–I just wanted her to work a little.  I guess you could say I was toying with her; having a little fun.  You can say I really didn’t see it as serious by then, or I would have sat down a for a pointed little meeting with her.  I did, at one point, try to get her to call me early for a wake up call so that I could quickly grab the phone and start a conversation.  She allowed the phone to ring until I picked it up, then she hung up–blipped out.  We eventually started seeing each other less and less. I just couldn’t communicate with her; she obviously did not want to talk to me.  That’s all I have left of the memories of Tracy.”

“So it sounds like you’re saying that I really have no chance of getting this girl to communicated with me?”

“No. What I’m saying is that she may have commubia: it’s just that phobia of talking with someone face-to-face. Ever meet someone who cannot seem to look at you straight in the eyes? Well, that’s a form of commubia. A full-blown case would be when that same person can only talk to you through text message, through a door, loudly through a wall, from behind a counter, or some other sort of veil. Though you get irritated, understand that she may have a serious condition–it’s hard to say what it is. And, as I said, there are clinics and support groups for that sort of thing.”

“What should I do?”

“If you truly want this to work, and enjoy being with her, talk to her about it, and be patient. Everyone’s got something.”

“Wow! I never knew.”

“Or, consider that she may not really want to talk to you.”

“What?”

“Just saying…”

She just hangs up

small.bull.dog

Buddy and Gary sit, quietly sipping on some new exotic coffee drink recommended to them by the barista, a young twenty-something, who goes by the name Four, as in the number.
Gary scratches his hind leg with his left paw, rapidly. Buddy watches him with a slight glance of the eyes.

“So right in the middle of the brief conversation, everything goes silent. ‘Hello. Hello,’ I say. Then, Buddy, I receive a text message from Gwen. Sometimes, it’s four or five texts in a row–140 characters, you know. It usually starts with an apology for not talking on the phone. She says it’s the cell phone, cancer thing. But she’s stopped using that one. Then she will send a picture of herself eating something like dessert, in a strange standing pose. Does this seem odd to you? I mean, face to face would be great, but I would even settle for a few minutes talking on the phone; two cans with string; anything. I really don’t think it’s so much to ask.”

“Nah, not too much. Maybe she has commubia.”

“Is that when a person can only communicate with a cell phone or pictures, but is fear-struck when real, face to face verbal communication takes place?”

“Yes it is, Gary; and, most of the communication is done by texting on the phone, not by talking on the phone. I’ve read that many have developed severe cases of commubia and, as of yet, they have found no simple remedy other than complete separation from the communication device. They even hold weekend clinics which set out to cure this modern, social malady. Success varies, depending on the individual, experts say. Is she young and restless? Is she one of the bruzias who spends constant hours on her device texting? Okay, Gary, does she have ADD?”

“Does she have ADD? Yes, but she has the other ADD. You know, it’s the close cousin to not being able to focus and concentrate. She has ADD+, where she doesn’t receive enough attention. Now that’s true Attention Deficit Disorder. But that doesn’t explain her inability to hold a conversation other than in text messages.

“If we only had a way to communicate with others without texting or speaking to them face to face, Buddy, that would be amazing!”

“We do, it’s called writing letters; and we gave that up decades ago, along with lobotomies, Corvairs, and panel wagons. Okay, let me explain something to you.”

to be continued…